Alliteration

Discussion in 'Glossary Term of the Day' started by MsJacquiiC, Jan 7, 2012.

  1. MsJacquiiC

    MsJacquiiC
    Provocative
    Poetica Magnifique Staff Member
    6,015
    115
    248
    Jun 8, 2006
    Female
    Tennessee
    2
    Alliteration is the repetition of initial stressed, consonant sounds in a series of words within a phrase or verse line. Alliteration has historically developed largely through poetry, in which it more narrowly refers to the repetition of a consonant in any syllables that, according to the poem's meter, are stressed, as in James Thomson's verse "Come…dragging the lazy languid Line along".

    Alliteration need not reuse all initial consonants; “pizza” and “place” alliterate. An example alliteration may be seen in Dylan Thomas’s “Lie Still, Sleep Becalmed,” as excerpted below:

    [fieldset=excerpt from Lie Still, Sleep Becalmed by Dylan Thomas]Open a pathway through the slow sad sail,
    Throw wide to the wind the gates of the wandering boat
    For my voyage to begin to the end of my wound,
    We heard the sea sound sing, we saw the salt sheet tell.
    Lie still, sleep becalmed, hide the mouth in the throat,
    Or we shall obey, and ride with you through the drowned.[/fieldset]

    See also assonance and consonance.
     
    Tags:
Draft saved Draft deleted

Share This Page

Loading...